Where To Find Food Trucks In And Near Orlando Oct. 13-19

DuPont pioneers food safety testing process

Dr. Manary stumbled across peanut butter as a solution to saving the lives of severely malnourished children while working in a Malawi village in 1999. It was during his time that he noticed people struggling with inadequate farming methods and nutrition and devised a food substance which was bacteria-resistant, easy to make and source, as well as being full of vitamins and nutrients. The answer, to him, was obvious. Two years later the American conducted a series of tests with peanut butter to see if it made a difference in reversing the effects of severe malnutrition without children requiring a hospital stay or travelling hundreds of miles for treatment. He made a ready-made mixture, or ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), and found 95 per cent of children had recovered from malnutrition within six weeks of eating the peanut butter paste. A child before treatment (left), two weeks into treatment (center) and six weeks after treatment started (right).Photo: http://www.projectpeanutbutter.org/ Dr. Manary told news.com.au from west Africa that the evidence was overwhelming that the food has the potential to save millions of lives. The ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) can treat severe malnutrition anywhere on the planet, he said. And he said the success rates speak for themselves. This approach is beyond research and innovation, he said. Our team has treated more than 100,000 severely malnourished children with on average 90 per cent recovery. His nutrient-rich mixture has even been endorsed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as the best way to treat malnutrition. The high-calorie, fortified peanut butter-like food contains mono-unsaturated fats, which are easy to digest, and are rich in zinc and protein. It also has the added advantage of not needing to be refrigerated for months and doesnt require cooking. The so called super food provides the specific, high-quality nutrition children need to recover, survive, and even thrive and has been shown to raise the kids immunity to such a point where they can be saved from diseases and illness including Malaria.

Food stamp users see access to program restored, Xerox says

An Electronic benefit Transfer card, food stamp recipients

Department of Agriculture spokeswoman Courtney Rowe underscored that the outage was not related to the government shutdown. Earlier Saturday shoppers left carts of groceries behind at a packed Market Basket grocery store in Biddeford, Maine, because they couldn’t get their benefits, said shopper Barbara Colman, of Saco, Maine. The manager put up a sign saying the EBT system was not in use. Colman, who receives the benefits, called an 800 telephone line for the program and it said the system was down due to maintenance, she said. “That’s a problem. There are a lot of families who are not going to be able to feed children because the system is being maintenanced,” Colman said. She planned to reach out to local officials. “You don’t want children going hungry tonight because of stupidity,” she said. Colman said the store manager promised her that he would honor the day’s store flyer discounts next week. Wasmer said the states affected by the temporary outage also included Alabama, California, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia. Ohio’s cash and food assistance card payment systems went down at 11 a.m., said Benjamin Johnson, a spokesman for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services.

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Turkey. Cranberries. Green beans and pumpkin pies. The safety of the food that’s an item on someone else’s list. Inside the labs of DuPont’s Nutrition and Health business at the Experimental Station , a team of scientists in Delaware whose life work is rooted in improving food safety testing technologies advance the BAX system, which the firm invented to detect foodborne pathogens, including salmonella, listeria and E. coli. This month, the BAX system was adopted by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service as the official method to detect E. coli in meat, carcasses and so-called environmental sponges, or swabs to detect pathogens in a work environment. The assays also were added to the group’s Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook . “It’s a very, very powerful technique,” said George Tice , research and development director of food diagnostics for DuPont Nutrition and Health. “One very nice feature about it is, depending on how you define your target, you can make it very specific for a strain of bacteria or a genus of bacteria.” In the late ’80s, now-retired DuPont scientist Vinay Chowdhry and a team zeroed in on a Nobel Prize-winning technology called polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which uses the DNA in an organism to identify another specific organism. DuPont became a pioneer in advanced food safety testing by applying the prize-winning science to the pathogen detection process in food and became the “first to introduce an automated detection system,” Tice said. Before DuPont’s BAX system was introduced, the gold standard was taking cultures, measuring them and letting them grow in a petri dish, which took at least five days, said Cathy Andriadis , global public relations leader for DuPont Nutrition and Health. In contrast, the BAX system delivers results in 10 hours or less. Meat, dairy, poultry and produce processors, large manufacturers of food and third-party labs that conduct food safety tests in products and in work environments are DuPont’s customers.